Leonard Bernstein’s Young People’s Concerts

Now streaming on Carnegie Hall+, viewers of all ages can experience Leonard Bernstein’s beloved Young People’s Concerts with the New York Philharmonic. In his most important role as music educator, Bernstein’s pioneering series of nationally televised broadcasts began in 1958 live from Carnegie Hall, making the concert hall an accessible classroom that introduced a new generation to classical music. New performances from the acclaimed series will be added to the extensive Leonard Bernstein Collection on Carnegie Hall+ each month.

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Young People’s Concerts Library on Carnegie Hall+

Trailer
Leonard Bernstein’s Young People’s Concerts on Carnegie Hall+
Leonard Bernstein standing at a podium Leonard Bernstein standing at a podium
Young People’s Concerts
Thus Spake Richard Strauss
Leonard Bernstein conducting Leonard Bernstein conducting
Young People’s Concerts
Forever Beethoven
Leonard Bernstein standing on the podium, with an orchestra, facing the audience Leonard Bernstein standing on the podium, with an orchestra, facing the audience
Young People’s Concerts
Who is Gustav Mahler?
Leonard Bernstein sitting at the piano with a group of children Leonard Bernstein sitting at the piano with a group of children
Young People’s Concerts
What Makes Music Symphonic?
Leonard Bernstein at the piano Leonard Bernstein at the piano

Featured Programs

Thus Spake Richard Strauss

Three years after Strauss’s tone poem Thus Spake Zarathustra found Hollywood fame in Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, Leonard Bernstein explores the work in depth at this Young People’s Concert with the New York Philharmonic.

Forever Beethoven

Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic celebrate Beethoven’s legacy with the first movement from his Fifth Symphony and Leonore Overture No. 3. Joseph Kalichstein is also soloist in the Fourth Piano Concerto, led by Paul Capolongo.

Who Is Gustav Mahler?

With excerpts from the Fourth Symphony that feature soprano Reri Grist and Das Lied von der Erde, Bernstein advocates for Mahler at a time when the composer’s place in the pantheon was less assured than it is now.

What Makes Music Symphonic?

Originally broadcast live on CBS, this episode features the New York Philharmonic performing Tchaikovsky’s Romeo and Juliet, Mozart’s “Jupiter,” and Brahms’s Second Symphony at Carnegie Hall.

What is Impressionism?

Bernstein dives deep into “the most famous music ever written about the sea”: Debussy’s atmospheric and magical La mer.

Berlioz Takes a Trip

Bernstein presents “the first psychedelic symphony in history”: Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique, which he calls “pretty spooky stuff.”

The Anatomy of a Symphony Orchestra

Bernstein dissects the resplendent orchestration of Respighi’s Pines of Rome and teaches listeners how to develop what he calls “X-ray hearing.”

Fidelio: A Celebration of Life

Beethoven’s only opera celebrates freedom and love with glorious music. After addressing some dramatic flaws, Bernstein showcases the work’s sublime musical highlights with the New York Philharmonic and a quartet of young soloists.

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